Abstract: Omnispective Analysis and Reasoning: A framework for managing intellectual concerns in scientific workflows

January 20, 2012 § Leave a comment

This paper will be presented at ISEC 2012.

Published in: ISEC ’12 Proceedings of the 5th India Software Engineering Conference

doi>10.1145/2134254.2134279

Author’s version of the full paper is available in ANU Research Repository.

Omnispective Analysis and Reasoning: A framework for managing intellectual concerns in scientific workflows

Srinivas Chemboli Clive Boughton
Research School of Computer Science
The Australian National University

Scientific workflows are extensively used to support the management of experimental and computational research by connecting together different data sources, components and processes. However, certain issues such as the ability to check the appropriateness of the processes orchestrated, management of the context of workflow components and specification, and provision for robust management of intellectual concerns are not addressed adequately. Hence, it is highly desirable to add features to uplift focus from low level details to help clarify the rationale and intent behind the choices and decisions in the workflow specifications and provide a suitable level of abstraction to capture and organize intellectual concerns and map them to the workflow specification and execution semantics. In this paper, we present Omnispective Analysis and Reasoning (OAR), a novel framework for providing the above features and enhancements in scientific workflow management systems and processes. The OAR framework is aimed at supporting effective capture and reuse of intellectual concerns in workflow management.

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Abstract: Omnispective Analysis and Reasoning: A framework for managing intellectual concerns in scientific workflows by Srinivas Chemboli and Clive Boughton is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

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Omnispective Analysis and Reasoning: An Epistemic Approach to Scientific Workflows

February 20, 2010 § Leave a comment

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Speaker: Srinivas Chemboli, Postgraduate Student, School of Computer Science (SoCS, ANU)

Date: Thursday, 25 February 2010

Time: 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Venue: CSIT Seminar Room, N101, CSIT Building, Building (108), North Road, ANU (campus map)

Website: Seminars @ CECS

Enquiries: Dr Malcolm Newey

Scientific workflows are used to connect together different data sources, components and processes to support research. These interacting components and processes are usually developed independently and may not be directly compatible, requiring considerable effort to integrate them. The execution-centric and implementation-focused nature of existing workflow management methodologies forces scientists to work at the low level of workflow orchestration and implementation. This makes it difficult and time-consuming to verify the provenance of and reuse existing workflows in a new context.

Omnispective Analysis and Reasoning lifts the process of scientific workflow management to a higher level of abstraction in order to support the effective capture and reuse of concepts and ideas (intellectual effort). The research tackles workflow context, provenance and agility at the concept, model and execution levels of scientific workflow management.

Improved support for these concerns will make it easier to rapidly form and evaluate research hypotheses. This will greatly enhance the scientist’s ability to understand and intervene in a rapidly changing world.

This seminar is part of the CECS Seminar Series.


Srinivas Chemboli is a PhD student in the Software Intensive Systems Engineering Group at the School of Computer Science.

Original Seminar Notice at: Omnispective Analysis and Reasoning: An Epistemic Approach to Scientific Workflows, CECS Seminar List, The Australian National University, 2010

Seminar: Fast food for Computational Scientists!

November 4, 2009 § Leave a comment

Speaker: Ganesh Venkateshwara, Research Staff, School of Computer Science (SoCS, ANU)

Date: Thursday, 05 November 2009

Time: 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Venue: CSIT Seminar Room, N101, CSIT Building, Building (108), North Road, ANU (campus map)

Website: Seminars @ CECS

Enquiries: Dr Malcolm Newey

“A sizable number of computational chemists (physicists, biologists and material scientists alike) use a wide variety of tools to perform computation, visualization and presentation. Many a times these are incompatible with each other, necessitating reliance on, often cumbersome, external tools    to perform appropriate conversions. A few of the computational chemists also use myriad programming environments to develop new computational codes or visualization tools. However, there is no environment that succinctly amalgamates programming environments and various tools available to a computational chemist, which many a times hinders easy integration and rapid application development.

“In this talk, I present MeTA Studio, a programmable cross-platform environment for computational chemists that aims to address this issue.”

This seminar is part of the CECS Seminar Series.

Ganesh Venkateshwara is a Post-doctoral fellow at the School of Computer Science, Australian National University, and is an active member of the school’s Computer Systems group.

Original Seminar Notice at: Fast Food for Computational Chemists, CECS Seminar List, The Australian National University

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