Academic & Research

Research

Omnispective Analysis and Reasoning

Scientific workflows are used to support research by connecting together different data sources, components and processes. These interacting components and processes may be from different sources and developed independently. As a result, they may lack explicit support for integration and may not be directly compatible. This necessitates considerable effort to integrate them together to form a composite workflow. In addition, the implementation-centric nature and execution focus of existing workflow management methodologies forces scientists to work at the low level of process orchestration and workflow implementation. Consequently, this makes it difficult and time-consuming to validate and verify the provenance of existing workflows and reuse them in a new context.

Omnispective Analysis and Reasoning (OAR) lifts the process of scientific workflow management to a higher level of abstraction in order to support the effective capture and reuse of concepts and ideas (intellectual effort). This research tackles workflow management at the conceptual, design and execution levels. The aim is to improve support for these concerns in order to make it easier to rapidly design, evaluate and implement workflow processes — thus enhancing the workflow practitioner’s ability to understand and intervene in a rapidly changing world.

This research is based on initial work funded in part by the Australian National University, and the Commonwealth of Australia, through the Cooperative Research Centre for Advanced Automotive Technology.

Supervisors

Clive BoughtonShayne FlintRamesh Sankaranarayana, and Elisa Baniassad.

Presentations and Publications

Accelerating Scientific Workflow Management

Poster presentation for CECS Poster Day 22 June 2009, Canberra, Australia

Omnispective Analysis and Reasoning: An epistemic approach to scientific workflows

Presented in CECS Seminar Series 25 February 2010

Translating Learning Outcomes in Moodle

Presented at MoodleMoot AU 2010 13 July 2010, Melbourne, Australia

Omnispective Analysis and Reasoning

Poster presentation for CECS Poster Day22 July 2010, Canberra, Australia

Contextualizing Learning Outcomes and Course Design in Moodle

Presented at Moodleposium AU 2010 8 October 2010, Canberra, Australia

Moodle Context Plugin

Forthcoming at MoodleMoot AU 2011 19 July 2011, Sydney, Australia

Abstract

We present the MOODLE Context plugin, a workflow plugin to capture and represent concepts, ideas, intellectual effort and rationale in course design and implement them using tools and resources provided by the MOODLE Learning Management System.

Effective design and delivery of courses requires alignment between the planned learning activities and the learning outcomes. However, it is generally not trivial to translate learning outcomes into course design using tools provided by MOODLE. This is further compounded by the differences between the language of andragogy and that used by MOODLE. Thus, there is a need to effectively capture the ‘rationale’ for design decisions in a course and map them to desired outcomes.

First, learning objectives and outcomes of a course are captured using an enhanced model of curriculum design. These concerns are then represented in terms of existing educational models. Finally, the design decisions for a course are implemented using MOODLE activities, enabling a two-way mapping between the educational goals and the underlying technological platform.

The MOODLE Context Plugin will facilitate the alignment between course goals and MOODLE activities and resources. The theoretical underpinnings of the MOODLE Context Plugin were presented at Moodleposium AU 2010 [1]. In this presentation we demonstrate the prototype implementation of the plugin. This plugin will improve the connection between the goals and intent of a course and its delivery.

[1] S. Chemboli, “Contextualising learning outcomes and course design in Moodle,” Moodleposium 2010, Canberra, Australia.

Contextual Course Design with Omnispective Analysis and Reasoning

Chemboli, S. & Boughton, C. (2011). Contextual Course Design with Omnispective Analysis and Reasoning. In G. Williams, N. Brown, M. Pittard, B. Cleland (Eds.) Changing Demands, Changing Directions. Proceedings ascilite Hobart 2011. (pp. ).

http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/hobart11/procs/paper156.pdf

Abstract

In this paper, we present a novel approach to contextualize course design by the application of the Omnispective Analysis and Reasoning (OAR) framework to map the goals and intent of a course to its design and delivery. Effective design and delivery of courses requires alignment between planned learning activities and learning outcomes. However, it is generally not trivial to translate learning outcomes into course design, particularly so when using a Learning Management System (LMS). This is further compounded by the differences between the language of teaching theory and that used by the LMS. Thus, there is a need to effectively capture the rationale for design decisions in a course and map them to desired outcomes. We illustrate the application of the OAR framework with a process for translating a learning objective into course design using the Moodle LMS.

Keywords: Context, Course Design, Moodle, Omnispective Analysis and Reasoning

Workflow for creating a chat activity in Moodle

The Moodle chat activity workflow


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